Archive for March, 2012

Ibsen Festival opens theater season in Lanesboro, Minnesota

Friday, March 30th, 2012

"Pillars of Society" — the featured production by Commonweal Theatre in Lanesboro — will be held during the Ibsen Festival April 13 to15. Seen from left are Jeremy van Meter, Stef Dickens, Scott Dixon and Catherine Glynn. (Bluff Country Newspaper Group photo courtesy of Jason Underferth)

By Lisa Brainard, Republican-Leader Newspaper

The 15th Annual Ibsen Festival will be held Fri, April 13 – Sun, April 15 in Lanesboro, Minnesota. Commonweal Theatre will open its 2013 season with a world premiere adaptation by Jeffrey Hatcher of Ibsen’s powerful “Pillars of Society.” Secrets from the past threaten to engulf a prominent businessman about to embark on the greatest project of his career. As always, the festival will include lectures, fine art, music, post show discussions and many other events to put this Ibsen work into context.

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Commonweal Theatre Ibsen page

Minnesota Happenings: Commonweal Theatre Company presents The Metal Children in Lanesboro, MN

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

MN Public Radio News

Posted at 1:02 PM on March 23, 2012 by Michael Olson

– Lis Pedersen, contributor, Minnesota Today

Lanesboro — The Metal ChildrencommonwealLogo08

This weekend the Commonweal Theater Company in Lanesboro, Minnesota will celebrate the opening of the play The Metal Children, written by the American playwright Adam Rapp. The cast includes Gary Danciu, Brandon Grayson, Carla Joseph, and Rachel Kuhnle, who are all a part of the 2012 Apprentice Company. The Metal Children presents a powerful story about the influence of literature, art, creation, and expression.

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A newcomer can find welcome in Minnesota. Eventually. by Steve Harris, owner of Anna V's B&B, Lanesboro, MN

Monday, March 12th, 2012
MPR News Commentary

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By Steve Harris

Steve Harris is director of philanthropic communications for the YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities. With his wife, Susie, he is owner and innkeeper of Anna V’s Bed & Breakfast in Lanesboro, Minn.

Are Minnesotans welcoming to newcomers? Over the last four decades I’ve “moved back” here four times, so I can offer an opinion. My answer sounds, well, Minnesotan: “Yes, kind of.”

MPR Story covers Steve’s first 3 moves “back to MN” and Lanesboro, Mn was his 4th MN move.  Read the whole story

My fourth Minnesota move was three years ago, to the little village of Lanesboro in southeastern Minnesota. Small towns (all towns?) are built on family connections. But even a small town has places where you can find friendliness and friends. It takes time. But it will happen if you work at it.

How do you do that? You volunteer at the Beer Garden at Buffalo Bill Days. You eat breakfast with the locals at the “Chat and Chew” restaurant. You walk your dog in the park and shop at the Farmer’s Market. You get out there and keep smiling and keep “visiting.” Minnesotans like that. And they will like you.

Sometimes they’ll even surprise you. A few months after we moved in, while on an out-of-state trip, we got a call from Dean, our new neighbor (whom we really didn’t know yet), telling us that a big storm had knocked down our large maple tree.

“We’re returning in a few days,” I said. “Can you call someone to take care of it?”

“Sure,” he said.

We returned to find the tree mess entirely cleaned up, and learned that Dean and his wife had done all the work themselves. When we offered to pay them for time and labor, they refused. “We’re neighbors,” Dean said. “That’s what neighbors do.”

Are Minnesotans friendly to newcomers?

Generally speaking, yes, but not in an overly expressive way. A unique combination of ethnic roots, family-centered culture and climate color that. But there are good people here, helpful and kind people, who are ready to do what they can for others, even the others they don’t know yet.

Maybe that’s why I keep coming back.

Read the whole story

A newcomer can find welcome in Minnesota. Eventually. by Steve Harris, owner of Anna V’s B&B, Lanesboro, MN

Monday, March 12th, 2012
MPR News Commentary

Larger viewBy Steve Harris

Steve Harris is director of philanthropic communications for the YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities. With his wife, Susie, he is owner and innkeeper of Anna V’s Bed & Breakfast in Lanesboro, Minn.

Are Minnesotans welcoming to newcomers? Over the last four decades I’ve “moved back” here four times, so I can offer an opinion. My answer sounds, well, Minnesotan: “Yes, kind of.”

MPR Story covers Steve’s first 3 moves “back to MN” and Lanesboro, Mn was his 4th MN move.   Read the Whole Story

My fourth Minnesota move was three years ago, to the little village of Lanesboro in southeastern Minnesota. Small towns (all towns?) are built on family connections. But even a small town has places where you can find friendliness and friends. It takes time. But it will happen if you work at it.

How do you do that? You volunteer at the Beer Garden at Buffalo Bill Days. You eat breakfast with the locals at the “Chat and Chew” restaurant. You walk your dog in the park and shop at the Farmer’s Market. You get out there and keep smiling and keep “visiting.” Minnesotans like that. And they will like you.

Sometimes they’ll even surprise you. A few months after we moved in, while on an out-of-state trip, we got a call from Dean, our new neighbor (whom we really didn’t know yet), telling us that a big storm had knocked down our large maple tree.

“We’re returning in a few days,” I said. “Can you call someone to take care of it?”

“Sure,” he said.

We returned to find the tree mess entirely cleaned up, and learned that Dean and his wife had done all the work themselves. When we offered to pay them for time and labor, they refused. “We’re neighbors,” Dean said. “That’s what neighbors do.”

Are Minnesotans friendly to newcomers?

Generally speaking, yes, but not in an overly expressive way. A unique combination of ethnic roots, family-centered culture and climate color that. But there are good people here, helpful and kind people, who are ready to do what they can for others, even the others they don’t know yet.

Maybe that’s why I keep coming back.

Read the whole story